micdotcom:

For many Muslim Americans, 9/11 was a double punch of tragedy and bigotry

The actions of 19 Islamic extremists on 9/11 left an indelible mark on America. Today, millions pause to commemorate the attacks’ 13th anniversary, to honor the victims and to remember that all life is special and sacred. But there’s an untold story amid the many speeches and moments of silence — one filled with a different kind of pain, grief and strong sense of loss. 
Those stories are now being told on social media

micdotcom:

For many Muslim Americans, 9/11 was a double punch of tragedy and bigotry

The actions of 19 Islamic extremists on 9/11 left an indelible mark on America. Today, millions pause to commemorate the attacks’ 13th anniversary, to honor the victims and to remember that all life is special and sacred. But there’s an untold story amid the many speeches and moments of silence — one filled with a different kind of pain, grief and strong sense of loss. 
Those stories are now being told on social media

micdotcom:

For many Muslim Americans, 9/11 was a double punch of tragedy and bigotry

The actions of 19 Islamic extremists on 9/11 left an indelible mark on America. Today, millions pause to commemorate the attacks’ 13th anniversary, to honor the victims and to remember that all life is special and sacred. But there’s an untold story amid the many speeches and moments of silence — one filled with a different kind of pain, grief and strong sense of loss. 
Those stories are now being told on social media

micdotcom:

For many Muslim Americans, 9/11 was a double punch of tragedy and bigotry

The actions of 19 Islamic extremists on 9/11 left an indelible mark on America. Today, millions pause to commemorate the attacks’ 13th anniversary, to honor the victims and to remember that all life is special and sacred. But there’s an untold story amid the many speeches and moments of silence — one filled with a different kind of pain, grief and strong sense of loss. 
Those stories are now being told on social media

micdotcom:

For many Muslim Americans, 9/11 was a double punch of tragedy and bigotry

The actions of 19 Islamic extremists on 9/11 left an indelible mark on America. Today, millions pause to commemorate the attacks’ 13th anniversary, to honor the victims and to remember that all life is special and sacred. But there’s an untold story amid the many speeches and moments of silence — one filled with a different kind of pain, grief and strong sense of loss. 
Those stories are now being told on social media

micdotcom:

For many Muslim Americans, 9/11 was a double punch of tragedy and bigotry

The actions of 19 Islamic extremists on 9/11 left an indelible mark on America. Today, millions pause to commemorate the attacks’ 13th anniversary, to honor the victims and to remember that all life is special and sacred. But there’s an untold story amid the many speeches and moments of silence — one filled with a different kind of pain, grief and strong sense of loss. 
Those stories are now being told on social media

micdotcom:

For many Muslim Americans, 9/11 was a double punch of tragedy and bigotry

The actions of 19 Islamic extremists on 9/11 left an indelible mark on America. Today, millions pause to commemorate the attacks’ 13th anniversary, to honor the victims and to remember that all life is special and sacred. But there’s an untold story amid the many speeches and moments of silence — one filled with a different kind of pain, grief and strong sense of loss. 
Those stories are now being told on social media

micdotcom:

For many Muslim Americans, 9/11 was a double punch of tragedy and bigotry

The actions of 19 Islamic extremists on 9/11 left an indelible mark on America. Today, millions pause to commemorate the attacks’ 13th anniversary, to honor the victims and to remember that all life is special and sacred. But there’s an untold story amid the many speeches and moments of silence — one filled with a different kind of pain, grief and strong sense of loss. 
Those stories are now being told on social media

micdotcom:

For many Muslim Americans, 9/11 was a double punch of tragedy and bigotry

The actions of 19 Islamic extremists on 9/11 left an indelible mark on America. Today, millions pause to commemorate the attacks’ 13th anniversary, to honor the victims and to remember that all life is special and sacred. But there’s an untold story amid the many speeches and moments of silence — one filled with a different kind of pain, grief and strong sense of loss. 
Those stories are now being told on social media

micdotcom:

For many Muslim Americans, 9/11 was a double punch of tragedy and bigotry

The actions of 19 Islamic extremists on 9/11 left an indelible mark on America. Today, millions pause to commemorate the attacks’ 13th anniversary, to honor the victims and to remember that all life is special and sacred. But there’s an untold story amid the many speeches and moments of silence — one filled with a different kind of pain, grief and strong sense of loss. 

Those stories are now being told on social media

(via america-wakiewakie)

Vintage 1971 photograph of an LAPD recruitment billboard in East L.A. that was defaced in response to the police violence being perpetrated against the community at the time.  After the deaths of Ruben Salazar and others at the hands of the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department, the agenda of the Chicano Moratorium protests in late 1970 shifted towards a focus on the violent tactics of law enforcement .  This image was originally published in the vol. 1 no. 4 issue of LA RAZA magazine.  The photo credit is unknown.

Vintage 1970 photograph of Chicana Brown Berets at a demonstration in East Los Angeles, from LA RAZA magazine, vol. 1 no. 4.  Photo credit: Raul Ruiz.

cultureofresistance:

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Blot_9-5_ThomasJackson

The chief of police for the Ferguson Police Department misled members of the media and the public when he asserted that his hand was forced in releasing surveillance footage that purported to show 17-year-old resident Michael Brown engaged in a strong-arm robbery at a convenience store hours before he was fatally shot by a police officer.

Chief Thomas Jackson distributed copies of the surveillance tape at a press conference on Aug. 15 in tandem with the public release of the identity of the officer who was responsible for shooting Brown.

When questioned by members of the press about the tape — which apparently had nothing to do with the fatal shooting of the unarmed teenager — Jackson told reporters that he was legally obligated to release the tape because member of the media had submitted an open records requests for it.

“We’ve had this tape for a while, and we had to diligently review the information that was in the tape, determine if there was any other reason to keep it,” Jackson said at the press event. “We got a lot of Freedom of Information requests for this tape, and at some point it was just determined we had to release it. We didn’t have good cause, any other reason not to release it under FOI.”

Jackson later said that the officer who fatally shot Brown — identified as Officer Darren Wilson — did not know that Brown had allegedly been involved in a robbery earlier in the day when the officer confronted Brown on a Ferguson road hours later. When asked by a reporter why the agency would release the surveillance tape, even though it appeared to have nothing to do with the fatal shooting of the teenager, Jackson replied: “Because you asked for it.”

However, a review of open records requests sent to the Ferguson Police Department found that no news organization, reporter or individual specifically sought the release of the surveillance tape before police distributed it on Aug. 15.

Last month, TheBlot Magazine requested a copy of all open records requests made by member of the public — including journalists and news organizations — that specifically sought the release of the convenience store surveillance video. The logs, which were itself obtained under Missouri’s open records law, show only one journalist — Joel Currier with the St. Louis Post-Dispatch — broadly requested any and all multimedia evidence “leading up to” Brown’s death on Aug. 9.

Other records that would have been subject to Currier’s request, including 9-1-1 call recordings and police dispatch tapes, have yet to be formally released by the agency.

The logs contradict Jackson’s claim that “a lot” of reporters had specifically “asked for” the robbery surveillance tape through open records requests before his agency released the footage. The documents raise more questions about why the video — which, by the chief’s own admission, had nothing to do with the shooting death of the teenager — was released in the first place.

A Ferguson police spokesperson did not return a request for comment.

The Department of Justice had asked the Ferguson police department not to distribute a copy of the surveillance tape, according to a report by NBC News. DOJ officials confirmed they had a copy of the tape, but said they never considered releasing it, NBC said.

Shortly after the tape was released, the Brown family released a statement charging police with attempting to smear the character of the slain teenager.

“Michael Brown’s family is beyond outraged at the devious way the police chief has chosen to disseminate piecemeal information in a manner intended to assassinate the character of their son,” the family said in a statement. “It is no way transparent to release the still photographs alleged to be Michael Brown, and refuse to release the photographs of the officer that executed him.”

Family attorney Benjamin Crump echoed the same sentiment in a statement e-mailed to TheBlot early Friday morning.

“The reports of the Ferguson Police Chief deliberate misleading account about the basis for his release of the video tape is very troubling to Michael Brown’s family,” Crump wrote. “It follows a disturbing pattern of behavior by the Ferguson Police Department since this tragedy occurred. This simply serves as another example of why many in the Ferguson community lack trust in all of the local law enforcement officials and the grand jury process, in general and Chief Jackson, in particular.”

Days of violent protests and looting plagued the community of Ferguson immediately after Brown’s death. Some attributed the violence to the militant response by the Ferguson Police Department, prompting the Missouri State Highway Patrol to assume security in the town.

Peaceful demonstrations were held shortly after the MSHP stepped in; however, violence reignited in Ferguson the evening after the surveillance tape was released.

“[Jackson] is inciting the community all over again,” Brown family attorney Anthony Gray said.

DOCUMENT: See the FOIA request log obtained by TheBlot Magazine

Source: Matthew Keys for The Blot Magazine

(via america-wakiewakie)

Vintage photograph of father and child in brown beret at 1970 Chicano Moratorium, August 29, 1970.

Vintage photograph of the LASD and their collaborator on August 29, 1970.

Who helped the LASD in their assassination of Ruben Salazar?

This guy, in the quilted, sleeveless, jacket.  See RUBEN SALAZAR: MAN IN THE MIDDLE, for the details.


The photo, taken by Raul Ruiz, was originally published in the Vol. No. 3, SPECIAL ISSUE of LA RAZA magazine.

NEVER FORGET

thinkmexican:

1970 Chicano Moratorium
44 years ago today, 30,000 marched in East LA in the Chicano Moratorium in protest of the Vietnam War, and in an act of self-determination for Chicanos. Historians believe the Chicano Moratorium was one of the largest anti-war protests of its day and the first to call attention to the number of Chicanos disproportionately represented in Vietnam.
Thousands who gathered at Laguna Park after the march to listen to speakers and performers were forced to run for cover after deputies from the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department began brutally attacking march-goers with night sticks. Reporter Rubén Salazar was one of them.
Salazar, who was a well-known journalist, was killed later that evening at the Silver Dollar Bar on Whittier Boulevard when sheriff’s deputies shot a tear gas canister into the bar. The canister hit Salazar in the head and killed him instantly. Salazar had clashed with local police in the months before his death, reports the LA Times. Ángel Díaz and Lynn Ward also died that day.
See documentary on the Chicano Moratorium. More stories here.
Stay Connected: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook
thinkmexican:

1970 Chicano Moratorium
44 years ago today, 30,000 marched in East LA in the Chicano Moratorium in protest of the Vietnam War, and in an act of self-determination for Chicanos. Historians believe the Chicano Moratorium was one of the largest anti-war protests of its day and the first to call attention to the number of Chicanos disproportionately represented in Vietnam.
Thousands who gathered at Laguna Park after the march to listen to speakers and performers were forced to run for cover after deputies from the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department began brutally attacking march-goers with night sticks. Reporter Rubén Salazar was one of them.
Salazar, who was a well-known journalist, was killed later that evening at the Silver Dollar Bar on Whittier Boulevard when sheriff’s deputies shot a tear gas canister into the bar. The canister hit Salazar in the head and killed him instantly. Salazar had clashed with local police in the months before his death, reports the LA Times. Ángel Díaz and Lynn Ward also died that day.
See documentary on the Chicano Moratorium. More stories here.
Stay Connected: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook
thinkmexican:

1970 Chicano Moratorium
44 years ago today, 30,000 marched in East LA in the Chicano Moratorium in protest of the Vietnam War, and in an act of self-determination for Chicanos. Historians believe the Chicano Moratorium was one of the largest anti-war protests of its day and the first to call attention to the number of Chicanos disproportionately represented in Vietnam.
Thousands who gathered at Laguna Park after the march to listen to speakers and performers were forced to run for cover after deputies from the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department began brutally attacking march-goers with night sticks. Reporter Rubén Salazar was one of them.
Salazar, who was a well-known journalist, was killed later that evening at the Silver Dollar Bar on Whittier Boulevard when sheriff’s deputies shot a tear gas canister into the bar. The canister hit Salazar in the head and killed him instantly. Salazar had clashed with local police in the months before his death, reports the LA Times. Ángel Díaz and Lynn Ward also died that day.
See documentary on the Chicano Moratorium. More stories here.
Stay Connected: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook
thinkmexican:

1970 Chicano Moratorium
44 years ago today, 30,000 marched in East LA in the Chicano Moratorium in protest of the Vietnam War, and in an act of self-determination for Chicanos. Historians believe the Chicano Moratorium was one of the largest anti-war protests of its day and the first to call attention to the number of Chicanos disproportionately represented in Vietnam.
Thousands who gathered at Laguna Park after the march to listen to speakers and performers were forced to run for cover after deputies from the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department began brutally attacking march-goers with night sticks. Reporter Rubén Salazar was one of them.
Salazar, who was a well-known journalist, was killed later that evening at the Silver Dollar Bar on Whittier Boulevard when sheriff’s deputies shot a tear gas canister into the bar. The canister hit Salazar in the head and killed him instantly. Salazar had clashed with local police in the months before his death, reports the LA Times. Ángel Díaz and Lynn Ward also died that day.
See documentary on the Chicano Moratorium. More stories here.
Stay Connected: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook
thinkmexican:

1970 Chicano Moratorium
44 years ago today, 30,000 marched in East LA in the Chicano Moratorium in protest of the Vietnam War, and in an act of self-determination for Chicanos. Historians believe the Chicano Moratorium was one of the largest anti-war protests of its day and the first to call attention to the number of Chicanos disproportionately represented in Vietnam.
Thousands who gathered at Laguna Park after the march to listen to speakers and performers were forced to run for cover after deputies from the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department began brutally attacking march-goers with night sticks. Reporter Rubén Salazar was one of them.
Salazar, who was a well-known journalist, was killed later that evening at the Silver Dollar Bar on Whittier Boulevard when sheriff’s deputies shot a tear gas canister into the bar. The canister hit Salazar in the head and killed him instantly. Salazar had clashed with local police in the months before his death, reports the LA Times. Ángel Díaz and Lynn Ward also died that day.
See documentary on the Chicano Moratorium. More stories here.
Stay Connected: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook
thinkmexican:

1970 Chicano Moratorium
44 years ago today, 30,000 marched in East LA in the Chicano Moratorium in protest of the Vietnam War, and in an act of self-determination for Chicanos. Historians believe the Chicano Moratorium was one of the largest anti-war protests of its day and the first to call attention to the number of Chicanos disproportionately represented in Vietnam.
Thousands who gathered at Laguna Park after the march to listen to speakers and performers were forced to run for cover after deputies from the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department began brutally attacking march-goers with night sticks. Reporter Rubén Salazar was one of them.
Salazar, who was a well-known journalist, was killed later that evening at the Silver Dollar Bar on Whittier Boulevard when sheriff’s deputies shot a tear gas canister into the bar. The canister hit Salazar in the head and killed him instantly. Salazar had clashed with local police in the months before his death, reports the LA Times. Ángel Díaz and Lynn Ward also died that day.
See documentary on the Chicano Moratorium. More stories here.
Stay Connected: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook

thinkmexican:

1970 Chicano Moratorium

44 years ago today, 30,000 marched in East LA in the Chicano Moratorium in protest of the Vietnam War, and in an act of self-determination for Chicanos. Historians believe the Chicano Moratorium was one of the largest anti-war protests of its day and the first to call attention to the number of Chicanos disproportionately represented in Vietnam.

Thousands who gathered at Laguna Park after the march to listen to speakers and performers were forced to run for cover after deputies from the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department began brutally attacking march-goers with night sticks. Reporter Rubén Salazar was one of them.

Salazar, who was a well-known journalist, was killed later that evening at the Silver Dollar Bar on Whittier Boulevard when sheriff’s deputies shot a tear gas canister into the bar. The canister hit Salazar in the head and killed him instantly. Salazar had clashed with local police in the months before his death, reports the LA Times. Ángel Díaz and Lynn Ward also died that day.

See documentary on the Chicano Moratorium. More stories here.

Stay Connected: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook

thepeoplesrecord:

TW: Violence: Today, May 30, is the day four years ago that little Brisenia Flores and her father were murdered in Arivaca, Arizona by racist Neo-Nazi anti-immigrant vigilantes. Brisenia was shot point blank in the face during the home invasion and her father was killed and mother shot.

We must not forget, ever, what hate rhetoric can do. Remind people and be vigilant about what anyone espousing hate against another group of people can do and lead to.

Today, have a thought about this beautiful little 9 year old, her family, and the community who lost so much through this death that no one wants to remember or at that time that Obama and the media never mentioned or had any ceremony for to symbolically stand against hate, racism, and xenophobia.

Today, in Arizona Mexican American Studies has been banned, books have been boxed up and sent out of schools, and the state of Arizona is under police seige against anyone who is brown. If you haven’t been there to witness it yourself don’t think it’s not happening because from personal experience it is.

No more of the conintuing 500 year long war of extinction upon Indigenous people. It must end! - Three Sonorans

Minutement group leader Shawna Forde & Jason Bush were found guilty on eight counts & are on death row for plotting the deadly home invasion. Albert Gaxiola was found guilty of the murders & sentenced to life without parole. 

(via thisisnotlatinx)

The Sofia Vergara moment at the 2014 Emmy Awards adheres to the recently researched argument that Latinas in film and tv are just sex objects without a voice, nada mas.  
But then who still watches the emmys anyways, or broadcast TV for that matter? The Sofia Vergara moment at the 2014 Emmy Awards adheres to the recently researched argument that Latinas in film and tv are just sex objects without a voice, nada mas.  
But then who still watches the emmys anyways, or broadcast TV for that matter? The Sofia Vergara moment at the 2014 Emmy Awards adheres to the recently researched argument that Latinas in film and tv are just sex objects without a voice, nada mas.  
But then who still watches the emmys anyways, or broadcast TV for that matter? The Sofia Vergara moment at the 2014 Emmy Awards adheres to the recently researched argument that Latinas in film and tv are just sex objects without a voice, nada mas.  
But then who still watches the emmys anyways, or broadcast TV for that matter? The Sofia Vergara moment at the 2014 Emmy Awards adheres to the recently researched argument that Latinas in film and tv are just sex objects without a voice, nada mas.  
But then who still watches the emmys anyways, or broadcast TV for that matter? The Sofia Vergara moment at the 2014 Emmy Awards adheres to the recently researched argument that Latinas in film and tv are just sex objects without a voice, nada mas.  
But then who still watches the emmys anyways, or broadcast TV for that matter? The Sofia Vergara moment at the 2014 Emmy Awards adheres to the recently researched argument that Latinas in film and tv are just sex objects without a voice, nada mas.  
But then who still watches the emmys anyways, or broadcast TV for that matter?

The Sofia Vergara moment at the 2014 Emmy Awards adheres to the recently researched argument that Latinas in film and tv are just sex objects without a voice, nada mas. 

But then who still watches the emmys anyways, or broadcast TV for that matter?

(via thisisnotlatinx)

Vintage Original Flyer for the August 29, 1970 Chicano Moratorium.

On August 29th, 1970, over 20,000 people marched in East Los Angeles to protest against the Vietnam War and raise awareness of the disproportionate number of its Mexican American casualties.  At the peak of the demonstration, the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department and the Los Angeles Police Department attacked peaceful protestors who were congregated in Laguna Park.  Moments later, a sheriff’s deputy shot and killed Mexican American journalist Ruben Salazar.  Three other individuals were also murdered by law enforcement that day.  The details of Salazar’s death are sketchy, but have since been determined by authorities as an “accident.”

The PBS documentary, RUBEN SALAZAR: MAN IN THE MIDDLE, provides an excellent background history on Salazar, and illuminates the political convictions of an individual who, even in the title of the film, is often problematically described as a moderate.  MAN IN THE MIDDLE has also been criticized for slandering Chicano activists and maintaining the murky details of Salazar’s very apparent assassination by law enforcement.

Back In 1971, UCLA students produced their own documentary, REQUIEM 29, which focuses more on the media and law enforcement’s distortion of the incidents at the Moratorium march, rather than on the “cult” of Ruben Salazar.  The film has not been released for more than 40 years, except as excerpts in other documentaries or in rare VHS copies.


In the wake of the police violence and the distortion of the truth by law enforcement and the media in the Michael Brown and Eric Garner cases, perhaps now is the time for the public to rediscover the truth of the complicit nature between the media and law enforcement that young people were already aware of over 40 years ago.

Those who do not know their history are doomed to repeat it….